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Latest Research : Paediatrics : Neonatology
  Last Updated: Nov 2, 2013 - 11:52:55 AM

Latest Research : Paediatrics : Neonatology
Premature babies are less sensitive to temperature sensations later in life
Premature infants who need intensive care or surgery are less sensitive to hot and cold sensations later in life, according to a study.

Dec 28, 2008 - 2:52:13 PM

Latest Research : Paediatrics : Neonatology
Study into pre and pro-biotic use in primary prevention of necrotizing enterocolitis
Scientists at UC Davis will launch a groundbreaking study to determine the best cocktail of pre- and probiotic supplements to give to premature infants to prevent a deadly intestinal disease.
Sep 6, 2008 - 10:16:07 AM

Latest Research : Paediatrics : Neonatology
Different approach needed to protect brains of premature infants
A study of how the brain of a premature infant responds to injury has found vulnerabilities similar to those in the mature brain but also identified at least one significant difference, according to neuroscientists and neonatologists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
Apr 11, 2007 - 5:12:23 AM

Latest Research : Paediatrics : Neonatology
Cot death could be linked to brain defect
The Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) or 'cot death' that kills about 300 babies a year in Britain may be linked to a defect in the brain, scientists have said.
Nov 4, 2006 - 7:24:00 PM

Latest Research : Paediatrics : Neonatology
So...how would you design your baby?
The well-educated are significantly more open to the idea of "designing" babies than the poorly educated, according to a new study by psychologists at the University of East Anglia.
Sep 5, 2006 - 6:07:00 PM

Latest Research : Paediatrics : Neonatology
Longer needles best for infant immunization
Infants vaccinated with a long needle experience fewer reactions but get the same protection (immunogenicity) as a shorter needle, finds a study published on bmj.com today.
Aug 4, 2006 - 7:26:00 PM

Latest Research : Paediatrics : Neonatology
Meconium may provide clues to fetal alcohol exposure
Fetal alcohol exposure is usually determined through self-reported maternal consumption. Self-reported drinking, however, is often an unreliable measure. Researchers have found that the presence of certain fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in meconium may provide a dependable biomarker of fetal alcohol exposure.
Jun 27, 2006 - 2:21:00 AM

Latest Research : Paediatrics : Neonatology
Delayed Umbilical Cord Clamping Boosts Iron in Infants
Just a two-minute delay in clamping a baby's umbilical cord can boost the child's iron reserves and prevent anemia for months, report nutritionists at the University of California, Davis. Iron deficiency is a concern for both wealthy and poor nations. It is a problem particularly in developing countries, where half of all children become anemic during their first year, putting them at risk of serious developmental problems that may not be reversible, even with iron treatments.
Jun 17, 2006 - 8:18:00 PM

Latest Research : Paediatrics : Neonatology
Researchers identify agents that may make vaccines effective at birth
Newborn babies have immature immune systems, making them highly vulnerable to severe infections and unable to mount an effective immune response to most vaccines, thereby frustrating efforts to protect them. Researchers at Children's Hospital Boston now believe they have found a way to enhance the immune system at birth and boost newborns' vaccine responses.
Apr 25, 2006 - 9:11:00 PM

Latest Research : Paediatrics : Neonatology
First FDA Clearance of Sterile Field Cord Blood Collection Bag
ViaCell, Inc. (NASDAQ: VIAC) and Pall Corporation (NYSE: PLL) announced today the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration clearance of a cord blood collection bag suitable for use in a sterile field. Pall and ViaCell collaborated on the development and design of the new collection bag. ViaCell has exclusive rights to the new collection bag for family cord blood banking and expects to introduce it as part of its ViaCord® collection kit. The new sterile field bag will give families and their health care providers the ability to more safely and easily collect umbilical cord blood from newborns, even when born by cesarean section.
Apr 25, 2006 - 9:05:00 PM

Latest Research : Paediatrics : Neonatology
Restricting vitamin D intake during pregnancy lowers infant birth weight
Pregnant women who drink a certain quantity of milk every day could have a healthy baby, says a study. Milk is an important source of vitamin D, calcium, riboflavin, protein and energy during pregnancy, but some women are advised to cut down their consumption for various reasons including the prevention of allergies in their children.
Apr 25, 2006 - 8:48:00 PM

Latest Research : Paediatrics : Neonatology
Extremely low birth-weight babies transition successfully to adulthood - Study
As young adults, the majority of extremely low birth-weight infants are attaining similar levels of education, employment and independence as normal birth-weight infants, according to a study by researchers at the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine at McMaster University in the February 8 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). This is good news for the infants and their parents, as more than a quarter of low birth weight children have development difficulties such as cerebral palsy, blindness and delayed development, compared to two per cent of normal birth-weight infants. Dr. Saroj Saigal, professor of pediatrics, conducted a study over two years to determine the outcomes at young adulthood of extremely low birth-weight infants, in comparison to a group of normal birth-weight children. The measures of successful transition to adulthood included educational attainment, student and/or working roles, independent living, getting married, and parenthood.
Feb 8, 2006 - 11:24:00 AM

Latest Research : Paediatrics : Neonatology
Breastfeeding protects babies from respiratory illness
Breastfeeding could protect babies from respiratory illness, says a study adding to mounting evidence that the longer a mother breastfeeds her infant the greater the health benefits.
Feb 7, 2006 - 3:20:00 PM

Latest Research : Paediatrics : Neonatology
Risk of death by SIDS increases in the winter months
During these colder months, parents often place extra blankets or clothes on infants, hoping to provide them with more warmth. In fact, the extra material may actually increase infantsÂ’ risk for SIDS.
Jan 18, 2006 - 11:42:00 PM

Latest Research : Paediatrics : Neonatology
Pacifiers Reduce Sudden Infant Deaths (SIDS)
Use of a dummy seems to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), finds a study published online by the BMJ today. Researchers in California interviewed mothers or carers of 185 infants who died and 312 randomly selected controls matched for race/ethnicity and age. They obtained information on dummy use during the index sleep (defined as the last sleep or the sleep during the night before the interview), on other environmental factors related to sleep, and on risk factors for SIDS. After adjusting for known risk factors, use of a dummy during sleep was associated with a 90% reduced risk of SIDS compared with infants who did not use a dummy.
Dec 9, 2005 - 9:27:00 PM

Latest Research : Paediatrics : Neonatology
Neonatal intensive care unit designs are critical to infant health
Effective neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) provide more than just services - they're designed in a way that contributes to the health of the infants being treated, says a Texas A&M University authority on health care facility design and environmental psychology.
Jun 17, 2005 - 3:32:00 AM

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