RxPG News Feed for RxPG News

Medical Research Health Special Topics World
  Home
 
   Health
 Aging
 Asian Health
 Events
 Fitness
 Food & Nutrition
 Happiness
 Men's Health
 Mental Health
 Occupational Health
 Parenting
 Public Health
 Sleep Hygiene
 Women's Health
 
   Healthcare
 Africa
 Australia
 Canada Healthcare
 China Healthcare
 India Healthcare
 New Zealand
 South Africa
 UK
 USA
 World Healthcare
 
   Latest Research
 Aging
 Alternative Medicine
 Anaethesia
 Biochemistry
 Biotechnology
 Cancer
 Cardiology
 Clinical Trials
 Cytology
 Dental
 Dermatology
 Embryology
 Endocrinology
 ENT
 Environment
 Epidemiology
 Gastroenterology
 Genetics
 Gynaecology
 Haematology
 Immunology
 Infectious Diseases
 Medicine
 Metabolism
 Microbiology
 Musculoskeletal
 Nephrology
 Neurosciences
 Obstetrics
 Ophthalmology
 Orthopedics
 Paediatrics
 Pathology
 Pharmacology
 Physiology
 Physiotherapy
 Psychiatry
 Radiology
 Rheumatology
 Sports Medicine
 Surgery
 Toxicology
 Urology
 
   Medical News
 Awards & Prizes
 Epidemics
 Launch
 Opinion
 Professionals
 
   Special Topics
 Ethics
 Euthanasia
 Evolution
 Feature
 Odd Medical News
 Climate

Last Updated: Oct 11, 2012 - 10:22:56 PM
Parenting Channel

subscribe to Parenting newsletter
Health : Parenting

   EMAIL   |   PRINT
Hands off the medicine cabinet when treating sick children

Sep 5, 2007 - 8:44:23 AM
'Children do not like the taste of many medications or they can cause pain,' says Matthias Schneider, a pharmacist from Dillingen. Sweet juices or drops are easier to swallow than tablets or capsules and can be dosed properly, making them ideal, he says. If swallowing is a problem, for example due to bad bouts of coughing, enemas and suppositories are other options.

 
[RxPG] Munich, Sep 5 - It's no secret that children suffer more coughs, sniffles and fevers than adults. However, the course of action for parents when they find themselves forced into the role of nurse is not always clear.

Assessing the suitability of medications is one of the biggest challenges and there are risks.

Usually it's difficult for parents to gauge the type and severity of their child's illness, says the Federal Association of German Apothecary Groups - in Berlin. That means parents should always consult a doctor or pharmacist before treating a child themselves.

'Children are not small adults,' says Christina Jaeger, a Bremen-based pharmacist. Parents should never give children smaller doses of medications for adult as they cannot handle all drugs and will respond differently.

Even homeopathic drugs are not without dangers. Essential oils like menthol or camphor might stop an adult's sniffles, but they can arrest children's breathing. Jaeger recommends treating children two to three times a day with an isotonic salt solution instead.

Still, there is room for homeopathic medicine when treating children because it can be much milder, says Margit Schlenk, a pharmacist from Nuremberg. Plant-based medicines combined with regular medication can help speed healing and lessen side effects.

Proper use of plant-based medicines and household remedies can often prevent a doctor's visit, says Bernd Simon, a paediatrician from Munich. An onion poultice for example can alleviate earaches. Throat or chest poultices or special teas for coughing are effective for sore throats and fever, adds Jaeger.

As a rule of thumb, always consult your doctor first if an illness lingers more than two days. In cases of regular vomiting or diarrhoea, Simon advises going to a doctor within 24 hours. Excruciating pain should send you heading to a doctor immediately.

Medication should be adjusted for the child.

'Children do not like the taste of many medications or they can cause pain,' says Matthias Schneider, a pharmacist from Dillingen. Sweet juices or drops are easier to swallow than tablets or capsules and can be dosed properly, making them ideal, he says. If swallowing is a problem, for example due to bad bouts of coughing, enemas and suppositories are other options.

When using salves and creams, it's important to remember that a child's skin surface is relative to their weight. That means creams should be applied thinly.




Advertise in this space for $10 per month. Contact us today.


Related Parenting News
Moms go online for seeking parenting advice
Exposure to Cigarette Smoke Robs Kids of Antioxidants
Good parenting may steer teens away from drinking problems
Kids safe and secure with grandparents around
Vaccinating family members protects newborns from flu
Hands off the medicine cabinet when treating sick children
High-quality child care for low-income children offset the risk of later depression
A mother's attentiveness to baby's distress is important
DDT in moms harmful to kids, study
Internet could induce self-destructive behaviour

Subscribe to Parenting Newsletter

Enter your email address:


 Feedback
For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 
Contact us

RxPG Online

Nerve

 

    Full Text RSS

© All rights reserved by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited (India)