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Last Updated: Oct 11, 2012 - 10:22:56 PM
The American Journal of Gastroenterology Colon Channel

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Latest Research : Cancer : Colon

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Diet pattern may effect the development of colon cancer

Dec 19, 2005 - 10:33:00 PM , Reviewed by: Rashmi Yadav
Those who had consumed diets higher in processed meats showed a greater risk of developing recurrent colorectal adenomas. Those with diets high in certain white meats, like chicken, were less prone to this risk.

 
[RxPG] A recent study in The American Journal of Gastroenterology revealed that patterns in diet may effect the development of colorectal adenomas, or precancerous polyps of the colon.

In this study, over 1500 patients underwent baseline colonoscopy to remove existing polyps. They were then given a survey about their diet. After a period of one and then four years later, the group underwent follow-up colonoscopies to determine if any polyps had returned. Those who had consumed diets higher in processed meats showed a greater risk of developing recurrent colorectal adenomas. Those with diets high in certain white meats, like chicken, were less prone to this risk.

"Our results are consistent with prior studies that suggest certain dietary factors may be important in the development of colon polyps and cancer," states Douglas Robertson, lead researcher of the study and Chief of the Section of Gastroenterology at the VA Medical Center in White River Junction, Vermont.

Previous studies have explored whether fiber intake effects the growth and development of colorectal adenomas and cancer, however, this study found no significant evidence to suggest an association. The same was determined for dietary intake of fat and red meat.

According to the National Cancer Institute and U.S. National Institutes of Health, Colorectal cancer is the third most common type of non-skin cancer in men (after prostate cancer and lung cancer) and in women (after breast cancer and lung cancer). It is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States with more than 57,000 people dying from colorectal cancer each year.



Publication: The American Journal of Gastroenterology

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 Additional information about the news article
This article is published in The American Journal of Gastroenterology. Media who wish to receive a PDF of this article may contact [email protected]

Douglas J. Robertson, MD, MPH is also Assistant Professor of Medicine at Dartmouth Medical School. He is currently clinical director of the Vitamin D/Calcium Polyp Prevention Study, a large multi-center trial that aims to determine whether intake of Vitamin D and/or calcium supplements can reduce adenoma recurrence in those with a history of colon adenomas. Dr. Robertson is available for questions and interviews during the weekdays and can be reached at (802) 295-3963 x5590 or [email protected]

About The American Journal of Gastroenterology
The American Journal of Gastroenterology, the official publication of the American College of Gastroenterology, is THE clinical journal for all practicing gastroenterologists, hepatologists and GI endoscopists. With an impact factor of 4.716, it is the authoritative clinical source in the field of gastroenterology. With a broad-based, rigorous, interdisciplinary approach, the journal presents the latest important information in the field of gastroenterology including original manuscripts, meta-analyses and reviews, health economic papers, debates and consensus statements of clinical relevance in gastroenterology. The reports will highlight new observations and original research, results with innovative treatments and all other topics relevant to clinical gastroenterology. Case reports highlighting disease mechanisms or particularly important clinical observations and letters on articles published in the Journal are included.

About Blackwell Publishing
Blackwell Publishing is the world's leading society publisher, partnering with more than 600 academic and professional societies. Blackwell publishes over 750 journals annually and, to date has published close to 6,000 text and reference books, across a wide range of academic, medical, and professional subjects.

Contact: Sharon Agsalda
[email protected]
781-388-8507
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
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