RxPG News Feed for RxPG News

Medical Research Health Special Topics World
 Asian Health
 Food & Nutrition
 Men's Health
 Mental Health
 Occupational Health
 Public Health
 Sleep Hygiene
 Women's Health
 Canada Healthcare
 China Healthcare
 India Healthcare
 New Zealand
 South Africa
 World Healthcare
   Latest Research
 Alternative Medicine
  Bone Cancer
  Breast Cancer
  Cervical Cancer
  Gastric Cancer
  Liver Cancer
  Nerve Tissue
  Ovarian Cancer
  Pancreatic Cancer
  Prostate Cancer
  Rectal Cancer
  Renal Cell Carcinoma
  Risk Factors
  Testicular Cancer
 Clinical Trials
 Infectious Diseases
 Sports Medicine
   Medical News
 Awards & Prizes
   Special Topics
 Odd Medical News

Last Updated: Sep 15, 2017 - 4:49:58 AM
Research Article
Therapy Channel

subscribe to Therapy newsletter
Latest Research : Cancer : Therapy

   EMAIL   |   PRINT
Photodynamic therapy can help preserve the voice for patients with early stage laryngeal cancer

Jan 29, 2011 - 10:05:10 PM , Reviewed by: Dr. Sanjukta Acharya

"Photodynamic therapy is an effective treatment for early laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas, offering patients a less invasive option with fewer side effects than other therapies, while preserving the voice," says Vanessa G. Schweitzer, FACS, M.D.

[RxPG] Light, or photodynamic, therapy can help preserve the voice and vocal cord function for patients with early stage laryngeal (voice box) cancer, according to a study from Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit.

"Photodynamic therapy is an effective treatment for early laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas, offering patients a less invasive option with fewer side effects than other therapies, while preserving the voice," says study co-author Vanessa G. Schweitzer, FACS, M.D., a senior staff physician in the Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery at Henry Ford.

Each year in the United States, more than 10,000 people are diagnosed with laryngeal cancer. Those who smoke and drink alcohol are at a greater risk, according to the National Cancer Institute. Laryngeal cancer is most commonly treated with radiation therapy alone or in combination with surgery or chemotherapy.

But photodynamic therapy offers some patients another option.

"It is a good alternative to radiation and surgery for early staged lesions. It can preserve function and allow us to reserve use of radiation therapy and surgery – both known to have more functional impairment on vocal cord function – should the cancer recur following photodynamic therapy," says study lead author Melissa L. Somers, M.D., with the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at Henry Ford.

Having already performed more than 200 procedures – more than any other hospital in Michigan – Henry Ford physicians are center stage in the application and research for this procedure.

Photodynamic therapy works by destroying deadly cancer cells without harming surrounding healthy tissue. It uses a powerful laser and a nontoxic, light-activated drug called PHOTOFRIN. The laser activates the drug, causing a reaction in the cancer cells and destroying them.

Since photodynamic therapy does not damage the underlying tissue, it not only allows for multiple treatments but also for it to be given prior to or following other therapies, and when radiation therapy fails.

However, there is not a consensus in research literature as to which treatment – surgery, radiation therapy or photodynamic therapy – produces the best outcome for voice preservation.

The current Henry Ford study focuses on 10 patients with early stage squamous cell tumors of the larynx treated with photodynamic therapy. The study assessed how well the vocal cords moved following photodynamic therapy.

Both before and after photodynamic therapy, patients underwent videostroboscopy exams, a state-of-the-art technique that provides a magnified, slow-motion view of the vocal cords in use. The technique uses a small, angled telescope inserted through the mouth or nose to measure vocal cord vibrations while patients repeat words or sounds.

Results were analyzed by a speech language pathologist and laryngologist specializing in voice disorders for vocal cord movement and vibration.

During the first five weeks following treatment, researchers noted a significant worsening in the non-vibrating portion of the affected vocal cords, which is expected, says Dr. Somers.

Ten weeks following treatment, there was a noticeable improvement.

"In our study, patients undergoing PDT demonstrated initial significant impairment in the vocal cord vibratory parameters of mucosal wave, non-vibrating vocal cold and amplitude of vibration as well as appearance of vocal cold edge for both the tumor and non-tumor side," says Dr. Somers. "Most notably, over the course of a few weeks and months, there were consistent trends toward normal vocal cord vibration."

Patients do experience minor side effects from treatment such as photosensitivity, making them more sensitive to light and susceptible to severe sunburns. This lasts for about four weeks following the procedure. Patients also may experience temporary hoarseness.

Dr. Somers hopes future studies are aimed at a prospective comparison of photodynamic therapy to surgery and radiation and subsequent voice production results.

Advertise in this space for $10 per month. Contact us today.

Related Therapy News
Taccalonolides from bat plants selectively kill cancer cells
Photodynamic therapy can help preserve the voice for patients with early stage laryngeal cancer
Bionic Nose to Detect Cancers
Anti- cancer gene discovered- new strategy for treatment?
Anthracycline induced heart damage can be reduced by prolonging infusion time
Genomic signatures to guide the use of chemotherapeutics
CDK2/FOXO1 as drug target to Prevent Tumors
Telomerase inhibitors may revolutionize cancer therapy
First ever shots of the cervical cancer vaccine administered in Queensland
Gleevec can be toxic to the heart

Subscribe to Therapy Newsletter

Enter your email address:

 About Dr. Sanjukta Acharya
This news story has been reviewed by Dr. Sanjukta Acharya before its publication on RxPG News website. Dr. Sanjukta Acharya, MBBS MRCP is the chief editor for RxPG News website. She oversees all the medical news submissions and manages the medicine section of the website. She has a special interest in nephrology. She can be reached for corrections and feedback at [email protected]
RxPG News is committed to promotion and implementation of Evidence Based Medical Journalism in all channels of mass media including internet.
For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

Contact us

RxPG Online


Online ACLS Certification


    Full Text RSS

© All rights reserved by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited (India)