RxPG News Feed for RxPG News

Medical Research Health Special Topics World
  Home
 
   Health
 Aging
 Asian Health
 Events
 Fitness
 Food & Nutrition
 Happiness
 Men's Health
 Mental Health
 Occupational Health
 Parenting
 Public Health
 Sleep Hygiene
 Women's Health
 
   Healthcare
 Africa
 Australia
 Canada Healthcare
 China Healthcare
 India Healthcare
 New Zealand
 South Africa
 UK
  NHS
 USA
 World Healthcare
 
   Latest Research
 Aging
 Alternative Medicine
 Anaethesia
 Biochemistry
 Biotechnology
 Cancer
 Cardiology
 Clinical Trials
 Cytology
 Dental
 Dermatology
 Embryology
 Endocrinology
 ENT
 Environment
 Epidemiology
 Gastroenterology
 Genetics
 Gynaecology
 Haematology
 Immunology
 Infectious Diseases
 Medicine
 Metabolism
 Microbiology
 Musculoskeletal
 Nephrology
 Neurosciences
 Obstetrics
 Ophthalmology
 Orthopedics
 Paediatrics
 Pathology
 Pharmacology
 Physiology
 Physiotherapy
 Psychiatry
 Radiology
 Rheumatology
 Sports Medicine
 Surgery
 Toxicology
 Urology
 
   Medical News
 Awards & Prizes
 Epidemics
 Launch
 Opinion
 Professionals
 
   Special Topics
 Ethics
 Euthanasia
 Evolution
 Feature
 Odd Medical News
 Climate

Last Updated: Oct 11, 2012 - 10:22:56 PM
NHS Channel

subscribe to NHS newsletter
Healthcare : UK : NHS

   EMAIL   |   PRINT
Is it time to give NHS more independence?

Jul 30, 2006 - 2:49:00 AM , Reviewed by: Priya Saxena
“We may now, indeed be ruled by fundamentalists whose faith in markets, competition, and the profit motive as the sole path to effective public service is unshakeable. Paradoxically, an NHS agency could spearhead the crusade.”

 
[RxPG] In April this year, BMJ Editor Fiona Godlee called for an independent NHS run by a board of governors responsible for managing health care within a set budget and a broad political framework.

In this week’s BMJ, four opinion leaders give their views on whether it is time to give the NHS greater independence from government.

“Democratic control is essential,” argues Stephen Thornton, Chief Executive of The Health Foundation. “Democratic checks and balances are the best way to ensure we continue to move the NHS in the right direction, not the creation of a barely accountable technocracy that would place all power in the hands of professionals and bureaucrats."

The key issue is how to do this more effectively than at present. He believes the trick is to deal with the democratic deficit in policy making and commissioning while giving much more operational freedom to healthcare providers.

A second article, by Gwyn Bevan, Professor of Management Science at the London School of Economics, argues that the destabilisation of the NHS in England through successive reorganisations has meant that the only options for governance have been either a competitive provider market or a regime of targets.

Each has serious limitations, he says, and the movement from one to the other has contributed to the squandering of unprecedented increases in NHS funding. His call for 'independence' for the NHS is to design systems of local accountability that would offer an effective alternative to provider competition or a centrally-driven regime of targets.

General gractitioner Stephen Gillam warns that "an independent NHS will become a glorified commissioning agency as what used to be a national health service becomes an amalgam of free floating foundation hospitals, NHS trusts, private companies, and traditional primary care providers."

“We may now, indeed be ruled by fundamentalists whose faith in markets, competition, and the profit motive as the sole path to effective public service is unshakeable,” he writes. “Paradoxically, an NHS agency could spearhead the crusade.”

In the final article, two US health experts believe that the NHS has the inherent capability to become the greatest healthcare system of any nation.

They applaud Labour’s original plan for “modernisation” and advise not to remove NHS leadership too far from government power. But they wonder whether something big should change to steady the NHS on its worthy, inspiring journey.

“The NHS is not just a national treasure; it is a global treasure,” they write. “As unabashed fans, we urge a dialogue on possible forms of stabilisation to better provide the NHS with the time, space, and constancy of purpose to realise its enormous promise.”



Publication: British Medical Journal, 29 July 2006 (Vol 333, No 7561)
On the web: Read the full article at bmj.com 

Advertise in this space for $10 per month. Contact us today.


Related NHS News
Systematic bias in the assessment of UK doctors
Depression is wrongly seen as natural part of getting older
NRI doctor guilty of unethical tests on British patients
New steps to curb overseas doctors in Britain
Should EU patient information laws be relaxed?
Institutional discrimination by NHS causing unnecessary deaths of people with a learning disability
Should the NHS curb spending on translation services?
The NHS Redress Act may lead to more complaints
Patients should cc the benefits of doctors' letters
Is doctors' pay responsible for the financial crisis in the NHS ?

Subscribe to NHS Newsletter

Enter your email address:


 Additional information about the news article
“The NHS is not just a national treasure; it is a global treasure”
 Feedback
For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 
Contact us

RxPG Online

Nerve

 

    Full Text RSS

© All rights reserved by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited (India)