RxPG News Feed for RxPG News

Medical Research Health Special Topics World
  Home
 
   Health
 Aging
 Asian Health
 Events
 Fitness
 Food & Nutrition
 Happiness
 Men's Health
 Mental Health
 Occupational Health
 Parenting
 Public Health
 Sleep Hygiene
 Women's Health
 
   Healthcare
 Africa
 Australia
 Canada Healthcare
 China Healthcare
 India Healthcare
 New Zealand
 South Africa
 UK
 USA
 World Healthcare
 
   Latest Research
 Aging
 Alternative Medicine
 Anaethesia
 Biochemistry
 Biotechnology
 Cancer
  Bladder
  Blood
  Bone Cancer
  Brain
  Breast Cancer
  Carcinogens
  Cervical Cancer
  Colon
  Endometrial
  Esophageal
  Gastric Cancer
  Liver Cancer
  Lung
  Nerve Tissue
  Ovarian Cancer
  Pancreatic Cancer
  Prostate Cancer
  Rectal Cancer
  Renal Cell Carcinoma
  Risk Factors
  Skin
   Melanoma
  Testicular Cancer
  Therapy
  Thyroid
 Cardiology
 Clinical Trials
 Cytology
 Dental
 Dermatology
 Embryology
 Endocrinology
 ENT
 Environment
 Epidemiology
 Gastroenterology
 Genetics
 Gynaecology
 Haematology
 Immunology
 Infectious Diseases
 Medicine
 Metabolism
 Microbiology
 Musculoskeletal
 Nephrology
 Neurosciences
 Obstetrics
 Ophthalmology
 Orthopedics
 Paediatrics
 Pathology
 Pharmacology
 Physiology
 Physiotherapy
 Psychiatry
 Radiology
 Rheumatology
 Sports Medicine
 Surgery
 Toxicology
 Urology
 
   Medical News
 Awards & Prizes
 Epidemics
 Launch
 Opinion
 Professionals
 
   Special Topics
 Ethics
 Euthanasia
 Evolution
 Feature
 Odd Medical News
 Climate

Last Updated: Oct 11, 2012 - 10:22:56 PM
Research Article
Skin Channel

subscribe to Skin newsletter
Latest Research : Cancer : Skin

   EMAIL   |   PRINT
High dietary phosphate may promote skin cancer

Mar 23, 2010 - 10:28:12 AM , Reviewed by: Dr. Sanjukta Acharya
"Another way to look at it is that a low-phosphate diet may help prevent cancer," Beck adds.

***image1***
 
[RxPG] A high dietary intake of phosphate promotes tumor formation in an animal model of skin cancer, researchers at Emory University School of Medicine have found. The results, published in the journal Cancer Prevention Research, suggest that a high intake of phosphates may promote tumor development and contribute to tumor growth in skin cancer, while restricting phosphate intake may help prevent cancer.

The researchers applied dimethylbenzanthracene, a carcinogen found in cigarette smoke, to the skins of mice, followed by another chemical that stimulates cell growth. Feeding these mice a high phosphate diet (1.2 percent by weight) increased skin papilloma number by 50 percent compared with a low phosphate diet (0.2 percent). Skin papillomas are the initial stage of skin cancer development, which may progress to full carcinoma.

"This is a very well established model for the initiation and progression of cancer, and the effects of many physiological conditions on cancer initiation have been measured this way," says senior author George Beck, PhD, assistant professor of medicine (endocrinology). Beck also is a member of the Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University.

Phosphate is an essential nutrient forming both the physical support for bones, when complexed with calcium, and the chemical backbone of DNA. Phosphate chemical bonds provide the energy currency in the cell, in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate). In addition, many oncogenes, the motors driving cancer cells to divide relentlessly, are regulatory enzymes that attach phosphate chemically to other proteins, turning their activity up or down depending on the protein target.

Altered levels of phosphate could be tipping the balance of these chemical reactions in complex ways, Beck says.

Public health researchers say that phosphate dietary intake has increased over the last 30 years and also may be underestimated because of the increasing contribution of food additives. Phosphate is added to a variety of processed foods such as meats, baked goods and soft drinks to improve texture and durability.

The authors calculate that the human dietary equivalent of a mouse's high phosphate diet is 1,800 milligrams per day, an intake level that many humans match or exceed. The high-phosphate diet did not have a corresponding increase in calcium, which would reflect the equivalent of a dairy-rich diet. A low-phosphate diet in the mice corresponds to 500 milligrams per day for humans.

"Another way to look at it is that a low-phosphate diet may help prevent cancer," Beck adds. Previous research on the effects of a restricted-calorie diet in the same mouse model of skin cancer lowered the number of skin papillomas by a factor comparable to that obtained by limiting phosphate intake.

According to Department of Agriculture data from 2006, the average phosphate intake for American males and females over two years old is 1,334 mg. The Recommended Daily Allowance is 1,250 mg for pre-teens and teenagers and 700 mg for adults, with a maximum tolerable level set at 4 grams per day.

Researchers in Korea have recently found similar effects of high dietary phosphate on lung cancer in mice. Beck says he began studying phosphate's influence on oncogenes in bone cells grown in the laboratory. He and his colleagues found that in the presence of high phosphate, bone cells divide more quickly and produce more osteopontin, a protein linked to the breakdown of bone, and other cancer-related proteins.

In this paper, Beck and colleagues also found that high phosphate activates the oncogene N-ras in skin cells, and that high phosphate in a mouse's diet increases the level of osteopontin in the blood.

He cautions that many foods naturally contain phosphate, but not all of it is absorbed equally, so the amount of phosphate consumed does not always reflect phosphate levels in the blood. In addition, phosphate requirements by the body may vary according to age, sex and daily activity, he says.

"Phosphate in the diet has been previously studied for its effects on bone formation and bone breakdown, as well as by cardiologists and kidney specialists," Beck says. "But outcomes and endpoints having to do with cancer have not been looked at. This is an area where we have to be careful about mechanism, because there are many influences on phosphate metabolism."



Publication: Cancer Prevention Research

Funding information and declaration of competing interests: The research was supported by the National Cancer Institute.

Advertise in this space for $10 per month. Contact us today.


Related Skin News
High dietary phosphate may promote skin cancer
Compounds extracted from vegetables help to inhibit melanoma
MicroRNA responsible for aggressiveness of metastatic melanoma cell lines
A novel designer molecule to fight malignant melanoma
Polyomavirus strongly associated with Merkel cell carcinoma
Behaviour increases risk of skin cancer in Americans
Gender linked to development of skin cancer
Marathon runners could face risk of skin cancer
Listening to the sound of skin cancer
Malignant melanoma cells secrete a potent embryonic growth factor

Subscribe to Skin Newsletter

Enter your email address:


 About Dr. Sanjukta Acharya
This news story has been reviewed by Dr. Sanjukta Acharya before its publication on RxPG News website. Dr. Sanjukta Acharya, MBBS MRCP is the chief editor for RxPG News website. She oversees all the medical news submissions and manages the medicine section of the website. She has a special interest in nephrology. She can be reached for corrections and feedback at sanjukta.[email protected]
RxPG News is committed to promotion and implementation of Evidence Based Medical Journalism in all channels of mass media including internet.
 Additional information about the news article
The Robert W. Woodruff Health Sciences Center of Emory University is an academic health science and service center focused on missions of teaching, research, health care and public service. Its components include the Emory University School of Medicine, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, and Rollins School of Public Health; Yerkes National Primate Research Center; Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University; and Emory Healthcare, the largest, most comprehensive health system in Georgia. Emory Healthcare includes: The Emory Clinic, Emory-Children's Center, Emory University Hospital, Emory University Hospital Midtown, Wesley Woods Center, and Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital. The Woodruff Health Sciences Center has $2.3 billion in operating expenses, 18,000 employees, 2,500 full-time and 1,500 affiliated faculty, 4,500 students and trainees, and a $5.7 billion economic impact on metro Atlanta.
 Feedback
For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 
Contact us

RxPG Online

Nerve

 

    Full Text RSS

© All rights reserved by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited (India)