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Latest Research : Neurosciences : Demyelinating Diseases
  Last Updated: Nov 2, 2013 - 11:52:55 AM

Latest Research : Neurosciences : Demyelinating Diseases : Multiple Sclerosis
Smoking associated with rapid progression of multiple sclerosis
Patients with multiple sclerosis who smoke appear to experience a more rapid progression of their disease, according to a report in the July issue of Archives of Neurology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.
Jul 13, 2009 - 3:32:03 PM

Latest Research : Neurosciences : Demyelinating Diseases : Multiple Sclerosis
Testosterone may help men with multiple sclerosis
A small pilot study suggests that testosterone treatment is safe, well tolerated and may reduce symptoms, slow brain degeneration and increase muscle mass in men with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, the most common form of the disease, according to a report in the May issue of Archives of Neurology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

May 14, 2007 - 8:43:17 PM

Latest Research : Neurosciences : Demyelinating Diseases : Multiple Sclerosis
Age of onset but not severity of Multiple Sclerosis inherited from parents
When more than one member of a family is affected by multiple sclerosis (MS), their ages at disease onset are likely to be similar, but disease severity may not be. These new findings have important implications for counseling patients, according to a study published in the January 30, 2007, issue of Neurology®, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
Jan 29, 2007 - 3:32:39 PM

Latest Research : Neurosciences : Demyelinating Diseases : Multiple Sclerosis
Cause of nerve fiber damage in multiple sclerosis identified
Researchers have identified how the body’s own immune system contributes to the nerve fiber damage caused by multiple sclerosis, a finding that can potentially aid earlier diagnosis and improved treatment for this chronic disease.
Oct 17, 2006 - 2:38:00 AM

Latest Research : Neurosciences : Demyelinating Diseases : Multiple Sclerosis
Fampridine may hold promise for treating Multiple Sclerosis
Acorda Therapeutics, Inc. (Nasdaq: ACOR) today announced positive results from its Phase 3 clinical trial of Fampridine-SR on walking in people with multiple sclerosis (MS).
Sep 26, 2006 - 6:50:00 PM

Latest Research : Neurosciences : Demyelinating Diseases : Multiple Sclerosis
CNS can send out signals to invite autoimmune attacks
It may sound like a case of blame the victim, but researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that cells in the central nervous system can sometimes send out signals that invite hostile immune system attacks. In mice the researchers studied, this invitation resulted in damage to the protective covering of nerves, causing a disease resembling multiple sclerosis.
Jun 16, 2006 - 11:49:00 PM

Latest Research : Neurosciences : Demyelinating Diseases : Multiple Sclerosis
Natalizumab Re-approved for Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis
U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the supplemental Biologics License Application (sBLA) for the reintroduction of Natalizumab as a monotherapy treatment for relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) to slow the progression of disability and reduce the frequency of clinical relapses. The approval for reintroduction was granted based on the review of Natalizumab clinical trial data; revised labelling with enhanced safety warnings; and a risk management plan, called TOUCH Prescribing Program, designed to inform physicians and patients of the benefits and risks of Natalizumab treatment and minimize potential risk of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). The reintroduction of Natalizumab offers new hope as an important therapeutic choice for patients living with this disabling disease.
Jun 9, 2006 - 12:10:00 AM

Latest Research : Neurosciences : Demyelinating Diseases : Multiple Sclerosis
Efficacy in relapse rate reduction beyond five years shown for interferon beta 1b in Multiple Sclerosis
Berlex announced today that Betaseron® (interferon beta 1b) remained consistently safe, effective and well tolerated over the long term, according to results of the Betaseron 16-Year Long-Term Follow-up (16-Year LTF) Study presented at the 58th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Neurology. This is the longest follow-up study for any disease modifying therapy in multiple sclerosis (MS).
Apr 5, 2006 - 2:51:00 PM

Latest Research : Neurosciences : Demyelinating Diseases : Multiple Sclerosis
Systematic Review Questions Accuracy of MRI in Multiple Sclerosis
The accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not sufficient to rule in or rule out a diagnosis of MS with a high degree of certainty, finds a study published online by the BMJ today.
Mar 24, 2006 - 1:21:00 PM

Latest Research : Neurosciences : Demyelinating Diseases : Multiple Sclerosis
Statins could prove useful in treating MS
Scientists at the University of California, San Francisco and Stanford University Medical Center are reporting compelling new evidence that the cholesterol-lowering drug atorvastatin could prove an effective therapy for preventing the progression of, and reversing the severity of, multiple sclerosis (MS). In the March 16 on-line edition of The Journal of Clinical Investigation, they report the results of a study that looked at the use of the drug (marketed as Lipitor) in combination with Glatiramer acetate (marketed as Copaxone), a drug already approved for treating MS. The findings demonstrate, they say, that the drugs worked synergistically, preventing or diminishing paralysis in mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model disease that closely resembles multiple sclerosis. Multiple sclerosis causes a variety of neurological symptoms including loss of motor control, visual loss or imbalance. A primary symptom is temporary, recurring paralysis in the limbs, as occurs in the mice.
Mar 17, 2006 - 1:56:00 PM

Latest Research : Neurosciences : Demyelinating Diseases : Multiple Sclerosis
12.5 kda cystatin may generate first simple test for multiple sclerosis
Johns Hopkins scientists report the discovery of a protein found only in cerebrospinal fluid that they say might be useful in identifying a subgroup of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) or identifying those at risk for the debilitating autoimmune disorder.
Mar 6, 2006 - 4:54:00 PM

Latest Research : Neurosciences : Demyelinating Diseases : Multiple Sclerosis
Fatal flaw in natalizumab, multiple sclerosis drug, trial
The drug in question is natalizumab. In November 2004, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration fast-tracked its approval for use in multiple sclerosis patients following promising results seen early in two clinical trials. But within months of the approval, some patients taking the drug had developed a rare infection - progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, or PML - and Smith and one other patient had died.
Mar 3, 2006 - 12:46:00 PM

Latest Research : Neurosciences : Demyelinating Diseases : Multiple Sclerosis
Azathioprine reduces new brain inflammatory lesions in MS
A medication that reduces relapse rates in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) appears to be effective in reducing new brain inflammatory lesions and is well tolerated, according to a study in the December issue of the Archives of Neurology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. The drug is azathioprine, an immunosuppressive agent that is well tolerated, easy to administer and monitor, and has been used for many years in the treatment of transplant rejections and autoimmune diseases. Azathioprine reduces relapse rates in MS patients, but its effects on the frequency and accumulation of new brain inflammatory lesions has not been studied in MS, according to background information in the article. MS is a disease of the central nervous system, marked by numbness, weakness, loss of muscle coordination, and problems with vision, speech, and bladder control.
Dec 14, 2005 - 5:22:00 PM

Latest Research : Neurosciences : Demyelinating Diseases : Multiple Sclerosis
Multiple sclerosis diagnostic guidelines (McDonald criteria) updated
An international panel of neurologists has updated the current guidelines for diagnosing multiple sclerosis (MS), strengthening the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The guidelines, published online November 10, 2005 in the Annals of Neurology, update the "McDonald criteria," created five years ago and named after the chair of the previous panel, Prof W. Ian McDonald of the Institute of Neurology in London.
Nov 10, 2005 - 1:22:00 PM

Latest Research : Neurosciences : Demyelinating Diseases : Multiple Sclerosis
Key Role Of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) In Multiple Sclerosis
A new study suggests that a substance made by immune cells plays a key role in the progression of a disease in animals that closely mimics multiple sclerosis (MS). The findings further suggest that blocking the molecule, known as macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) might prevent the progression of the disease.
Oct 20, 2005 - 4:09:00 PM

Latest Research : Neurosciences : Demyelinating Diseases : Multiple Sclerosis
Chromosome six gene screen confirms MS suspects
A cluster of genes on chromosome six is the only one that plays a significant role in multiple sclerosis (MS), according to the most complete genetic study to date in the disorder, presented at the 130th annual meeting of the American Neurological Association in San Diego.
Sep 22, 2005 - 5:05:00 AM

Latest Research : Neurosciences : Demyelinating Diseases : Multiple Sclerosis
Aquaporin-4 implicated in a form of multiple sclerosis
Researchers have identified a molecular suspect in a disorder similar to multiple sclerosis (MS) that attacks the optic nerve and spinal cord, according to a report presented at the 130th annual meeting of the American Neurological Association in San Diego. The protein, called aquaporin-4, is a channel protein that allows water to move in and out of cells.
Sep 22, 2005 - 4:59:00 AM

Latest Research : Neurosciences : Demyelinating Diseases : Multiple Sclerosis
Interferon Does Not Affect Duration Of "Black Hole" Lesions In Multiple Sclerosis
Although treatment with interferon appears to reduce the formation of new areas of damage in the brains of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), including lesions that appear as highly contrasted images, called black holes, on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), treatment does not appear to affect the duration of these damaged regions, according to a new study posted online today by the Archives of Neurology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. The study will be published in the November print edition of the journal.
Sep 13, 2005 - 1:57:00 PM

Latest Research : Neurosciences : Demyelinating Diseases : Multiple Sclerosis
Oral Contraceptives Associated With Reduced Risk Of Multiple Sclerosis
Over a three-year period, the risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) was reduced in women taking oral contraceptives, according to a study in the September issue of the Archives of Neurology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.
Sep 13, 2005 - 1:48:00 PM

Latest Research : Neurosciences : Demyelinating Diseases : Multiple Sclerosis
Fampridine-SR in Phase 3 Trial for Multiple Sclerosis Under FDA Guidance
Acorda Therapeutics announced today that it has reached an agreement with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on a Special Protocol Assessment for a pivotal, Phase 3 clinical trial of Fampridine-SR in multiple sclerosis (MS). A Special Protocol Assessment (SPA) is a process in which the FDA provides evaluation and guidance on clinical trial protocols for Phase 3 studies.
May 4, 2005 - 9:56:00 PM

Latest Research : Neurosciences : Demyelinating Diseases : Multiple Sclerosis
Cigarette Smoking linked with Progression of Multiple Sclerosis
Researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) recently discovered that cigarette smoking may contribute to the progression of multiple sclerosis (MS), suggesting that quitting smoking could limit or delay central nervous system deterioration. This is the first time that a modifiable risk factor for MS progression has been identified, providing a new strategy for patients hoping to control neurological damage from the disease. Study results appear in the March 9, 2005 issue of Brain.
Apr 26, 2005 - 2:20:00 AM

Latest Research : Neurosciences : Demyelinating Diseases : Multiple Sclerosis
Naltrexone for HIV/AIDS, Cancer, and Autoimmune Diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis?
A very low dose of the FDA-approved drug naltrexone has been discovered to be an effective up-regulator of the immune system. The new therapy, called low dose naltrexone (LDN), has shown remarkable effects on an array of illnesses including HIV/AIDS, cancer, and autoimmune diseases such as MS. The first conference concerning LDN will be held on June 11th at the New York Academy of Sciences in Manhattan. Recent clinical trials of LDN will be discussed.
Apr 19, 2005 - 11:10:00 AM

Latest Research : Neurosciences : Demyelinating Diseases : Multiple Sclerosis
AVP-923 will Help Control the Inappropriate Emotions Associated with Multiple Sclerosis
Now people with multiple sclerosis (MS) can have a better control over their emotions,thanks to the latest research that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology 57th Annual Meeting in Miami Beach, Fla., April 9 – 16, 2005.
Apr 15, 2005 - 11:05:00 AM

Latest Research : Neurosciences : Demyelinating Diseases : Multiple Sclerosis
Leptin's Role in Multiple Sclerosis
According to Giuseppe Matarese et al., increased levels of the cytokine-like hormone leptin in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) inversely correlates with the frequency of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (TRegs).
Mar 30, 2005 - 6:45:00 AM

Latest Research : Neurosciences : Demyelinating Diseases : Multiple Sclerosis
RPI-78M Decreases Progression of Multiple Sclerosis by Altering Gene Expression
RPI-78M is the lead drug candidate of Nutra Pharma's minority holding, ReceptoPharm, Inc. and is being studied in preclinical assays for its efficacy in treating MS. ERDI measured the effect of RPI-78M on gene expression using cDNA microarray technology to identify any potentially unique changes in gene expression that may be caused by the therapy.
Mar 3, 2005 - 4:24:00 PM

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